Under Repair.

Tuesday, February 16, 2016

Please excuse the lack of posts this week as I figure out the best way to fix quite a big photo issue on the site—thank you for your understanding as I sort things out. I'll be back next week with an update; until then, wishing you a wonderful week!



A few (picture-less) POVs in the meantime:
-On rotations.
-On being heard.
-On settling (in the best possible way).

Thank you so much for reading. Photo by Max Wanger.

Material Lust on Sight Unseen.

Friday, February 12, 2016

Although I'd met Material Lust designers Christian Swafford and Lauren Larson before, it wasn't until I visited their studio on assignment for Sight Unseen that I learned the story behind their brand, which produces furniture and home goods with decidedly dark flair. It was lovely to spend a fall morning in their space—to see their latest work, pore over their beautiful (and non-digital!) inspiration boards, and learn more about what inspires their cutting-edge aesthetic.

As it turns out, that aesthetic is one that's routinely confused for demonic. Says Christian: “We posted a photo on Instagram recently of a pentagram and a few of our chairs, and someone commented, ‘Unfollow these Satanists.’ Our design was based off of DaVinci’s Vitruvian Man. It was historical, but it had nothing to do with devil worship. Everyone feels the need to categorize.”


Find the full interview on Sight Unseen. Photos by Emily Johnston.

More from my Sight Unseen archive: Group Partner / Todd St. John / Ladies & Gentlmen Studio. Thanks so much for reading.

Recommended Reading / 60.

Monday, February 8, 2016

Every Monday, words to start the week.  



This week, from Studiocanoe: a short film called "Sum" that offers up an enormous dose of perspective in just four minutes. According to the film, we may spend 30 years of our life asleep, 200 days showering, six weeks waiting for green lights, and 18 days gazing into refrigerators—but spread over decades, these moments are just tiny, magnificent pieces of a much bigger picture. See it all, above.

Thanks to Freunde von Freunden for the link. More from Studiocanoe, here.

Three more, just because: 
-"Speed Dating for Rabbits."
-Louise Ma makes art of hard-to-describe emotions.
-Preschool pastimes: "We're playing sunset. We just travel around, like how the sun sets."

More recommended reads, here. Wishing you a happy Monday.

Recommended Reading / 59.

Monday, February 1, 2016

Every Monday, words to start the week.  


This week, via Apiece Apart: an interview with photographer Emily Johnston (whose beautiful work and words appear on this site often—including in my latest POV).  The Q+A is part of the fashion label's excellent ongoing series, Apiece Apart Woman, and though I loved all of this particular post, what stuck out to me most was Emily's response to a question about mantras:

"I don’t know that I have one, but lately I’ve been turning back to the words by Wendell Berry that my partner David left in my studio on one particularly challenging day this summer, 'The mind that is not baffled is not employed. The impeded stream is the one that sings.'"

I'm dazzled. Read the interview on Apiece Apart. Photos by Brian W. Ferry.

Three more, just because: 
-Conceptual time machines.
-Fellow Resident, a collection of interviews that gives readers a glimpse into "the homes and heads" of inspiring gay men around the world.
-"Normality is a paved road: It's comfortable to walk, but no flowers grow."

More recommended reads, here. Wishing you a wonderful Monday.

Melancholia.

Found via Swissmiss: the Melancholia clock, a numberless, colorless timepiece born of a very deliberate and thoughtful design. Writes creator Vadim Kibardin:

Like the film Melancholia, my clock...consists of two parts. The minute hand is called ‘Justine’, and she deals with her melancholic sister—the hour hand ‘Claire.’ And just as Lars von Trier’s planet, Melancholia, devours the Earth, my minute hand will devour the hour hand twice a day. Twice a day the minute and hour hands are at the top together. But slowly, melancholia descends between them like a curtain she has set in motion. It looks like the "sisters" truly suffer from doubts. Twice a day you see them meet and talk about their experiences of being alone. They have different tempos. But they have been two, and, for a brief moment they become one.



Read more, here.

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